Frontosa.com

Frontosa.com is dedicated to the discussion and husbandry of African Cichlids especially the Frontosa/Gibberosa species.
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 Post subject: Frontosa FOOD
PostPosted: Mon Mar 15, 2010 3:48 am 
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Hi. I had a hard time feeding my frontosa [2] last time. And read articles in this forum, which where very helpful. And I realized that I'm feeding the wrong food. Mine are 3 inch and 2 inch fronts, and have found out they like to eat easily softened pellets. Unlike the pellet that I bought made especially for cichlids; that it was hard because it was intended to stay for longer periods in the aquarium for frequent foraging of fishes [ am I right?], mine prefer easily swallowed pellets. I found this out of serendipity, I thank God [ I'm a Christian ], when I accidentally wet my local fish food from my LFS, i took hold of it and felt the soft consistency after being wet. Which this pellet was what they were feeding on before I tried the more expensive special food. So I realized that I should feed this easily softened pellet while they're young and small. And use the hard pellet to feed them when I can't be there to fed them frequently. And when they grow up having stronger GIT, I hope to feed them the special cichlid pellet which is hard. Fronts kinda chew their food from the throat, so I was wondering if they a teeth in their throat like carps?

BTW, does your adult fronts eat hard pellets? the size is 2mm.
Thanks!


Mon Mar 15, 2010 3:48 am
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 15, 2010 12:21 pm 
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Carps use their throat teeth for crushing shellfish etc. Fronts as predators use their teeth to catch a fish and swallow it in whole. I doubt they would chew anything. My adult fronts eat and swallow hard sinking pellets with no problem, but caution, do not overfeed. The pellets are high nutrition food so giving them small amounts is better. I just provide wet pellets to juvies for easier bites.


Last edited by bobo242 on Mon Mar 15, 2010 6:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 15, 2010 4:08 pm 
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Mine eat the hard pellets too.

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 21, 2010 7:52 am 
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ohh, so that's nice. i should feed my juviniles wet too, wet them over night to soften them.
and yeah, i've noticed that i should feed small amounts of high quality pellets coz their packed with nutrients and protein. my ran died coz of over feeding of cichlid bits pellet.

what size of pellets do you feed your adults?


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 21, 2010 8:07 am 
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I do not wet the pellets so long, after 10 min aprox. they are soft enough. Size for adults is between 3 and 10 mm, depending on type and mark.

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 21, 2010 8:30 am 
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chelonia";p="32153 wrote:
ohh, so that's nice. i should feed my juviniles wet too, wet them over night to soften them.



any length of time making pellets wet will lose vitamins, most important is to use a sinking pellet. I use both soft pellets and large hard pellets. My frontosa fry actually grow the fastest and love the large hard pellets most. It does not take them long to devour these large hard pellets. For 13 babies I throw in 3 or 4 pellets at a time, 2 or 3 times a day, sometimes only once a day if I think their bellies look to full. They have pretty good teeth for shredding. Though we've had this discussion before, I will respectfully disagree with some whom know much more than me, and say they do chew to some extent. You can also make your own food and save allot of expense. I am not sure what food options you have in the Philapines, but in the US we have a nice little online place called Kensfish.com You can buy 1/2 lb of "KENS PREMIUM SOFT&MOIST WITH KRILL" pellets for just $3.25 plus shipping. They are just as good as many of the expensive specialty brands, and my fronts love them. Besides treats I feed my large fronts this exclusively, and have fed it to the babies with success.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 21, 2010 11:59 am 
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...my 3.5" fronts eat hard pellets.. i give them tetrabites which is a sinking food... i combine with some frozen food like blood worms and brine shrimp as dessert...:) they love it... dont over feed!!!.. i feed sufficient amount 2 times a day...


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 21, 2010 6:30 am 
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I feed mine frozen smelt and market prawns, every other day. It's as close to nature as I can find for their food. I know that the smelt and prawns are salt water creatures, but they are still close to what they eat in the lake. And, at $2.29/lbs for smelt and $3.99/lbs for shrimp they are more economical than the prepared dry foods. It's probably cheaper in the Philippines, pare.

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 Post subject: Re: Frontosa FOOD
PostPosted: Wed Apr 21, 2010 4:24 pm 
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I feed mine prawns and brine shripe everyday and it helps them grow faster.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 21, 2010 5:08 pm 
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i agree with "me".

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What is Frontosa?


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 21, 2010 5:37 pm 
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Of course there is a certain pressure in their mouth /throat so a pellet could be smashed while swallowing but the question was if they use their throat teeth the same way as carps do. IMO they do not.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 21, 2010 11:03 pm 
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what do carps do?

when i feed my large 10.5" mpimbwe live goldfish for the fun of it. he'll spit it out after a minute of munching it, and out comes flesh and bones.

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 Post subject: Re: Frontosa FOOD
PostPosted: Thu Apr 22, 2010 7:03 am 
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http://fl.biology.usgs.gov/Carp_ID/carp_id_fig_9.jpg


"Pharyngeal Teeth

Cyprinids do not have jaw teeth. Instead, they rely on their pharyngeal teeth and masticatory pads to crush or process their food. The number, size, and shape of the pharyngeal teeth are generally species specific. In cyprinids, the fifth branchial arches are located on the floor of the posterior pharynx, anterior to its junction with the esophagus. To clearly view the pharyngeal teeth, it is often necessary to extract the pharyngeal arch. This can be accomplished by removing the operculum, gills, and other surrounding tissues. Alternately, the gills and operculum can be folded forward to expose the pharyngeal teeth. Much care must be exercised to extract an arch without damaging the teeth and resulting in an incorrect tooth count. In this guide, dorsal-view illustrations of pharyngeal teeth are given in each species account. The number of pharyngeal teeth is represented by a standardized formula. For example, a count of 0,4-4,0 denotes one inner row of four teeth on each arch. Alternately, a count of 1,1,3-3,1,1 denotes three rows on each side, with three teeth in the innermost row and two outer rows with one tooth each. By convention, pharyngeal teeth are read from the outside of the left to the outside of the right. Some species show dramatic changes with growth, and young individuals sometimes have pharyngeal teeth quite different from adults. The pharyngeal teeth illustrated in this guide are those of adult fish."


Thu Apr 22, 2010 7:03 am
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